Cépages

  • Blanc
  • Traditionnel (av. 1900)
  • < 2 Ha

Gouais

Nicknamed the Casanova variety, Gouais Blanc is a very old variety from the north-east of France which through natural crossings has given rise to more than 80 new varieties throughout Europe, including Chardonnay, Gamay, Riesling, Furmint, and many more. Banned for a long time in France, where this founder variety has almost disappeared, it has however been continuously grown in Haut Valais (Switzerland) since 1540, under the name of Gwäss. Highly productive and resistant to winter frosts, Gouais Blanc is now cultivated exclusively in Haut Valais, where it produces highly acidic wines with a marked aroma of pears.
Associated names : 
Gwäss
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • < 2 Ha

Mondeuse Blanche

An old variety of Savoie (F), Mondeuse Blanche has long been wrongly thought to be a mutation of Mondeuse Noire, which is much more common. In fact, DNA tests have shown that the rare Mondeuse Blanche is the parent of Syrah through a cross with Dureza from Ardèche, and a parent or a progeny of Mondeuse Noire and Viognier. In Switzerland, there are only a few plots of this discreet, late-ripening variety, producing wines of a neutral flavour with high alcohol levels.
Associated names : 
Dongine
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • < 2 Ha

Grenache

An old variety originating from the Aragon region (E) where it is known as Garnacha, which has several mutations (Garnacha Blanca, Garnacha Roja, Garnacha Peluda), Grenache then spread throughout France and Sardinia (Cannonau). Ripening very late, Grenache is suited to warm, sunny climates, where it produces wine rich in alcohol, with the aroma of warm strawberries. It has a limited presence in Switzerland.
Associated names : 
Cannonau
  • Blanc
  • Indigène
  • < 2 Ha

Himbertscha

An extremely rare variety of Haut Valais (Switzerland), Himbertscha is a natural offspring of Humagne Blanc, and a half-sibling of Lafnetscha, another curio from Haut Valais. Its name does not come from Himbeer (raspberry) but from the dialect phrase "im Bercla" meaning "in the arbour". It was saved from extinction in the 1970s by Josef-Marie Chanton, who is still the only producer in the world, with a tiny vineyard. Its wine is elegant and highly acidic, with strange musky notes.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • < 2 Ha

Kernling

A spontaneous mutation of Kerner discovered by Ludwig Hochdörfer at Nussdorf in the Palatinate region, it is marked by lower productivity.