Cépages

  • Blanc
  • Indigène
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Rèze

Originating from Valais (Switzerland), Rèze is one of the oldest varieties of the Alpine region. With records dating back to Valais in 1313, its name comes from the Regis family, very common in Valais in the Middle Ages, rather than the hypothetical Raetica of the authors of the Roman period. Through DNA testing, we have discovered a few sparse stocks of it in Maurienne (Savoie, F) and in French Jura, and several of its offsprings have been identified in Valais, Piedmont (I) and Trentino (I). Once a dominant variety in Valais, today there are only a few vines remaining of this unproductive variety which is prone to mould, producing floral wines with a distinct acidity. Rèze is the main variety for making the traditional Vin du Glacier in Val d'Anniviers.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Chambourcin

An inter-species hybrid of Seyve-Villard 12-417 and Chancellor created in 1945 by Joannes Seyve in France, it was named after the village of Chambourcin in Isère (F) and first sold in 1963. Resistant to cold and fungal disease, it can be planted in humid conditions. It produces highly aromatic wines. It has a very minor presence in Switzerland, mostly in Ticino.
  • Rouge
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Cabernet Cubin

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  • Rouge
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Marselan

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  • Rouge
  • Indigène
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Cabernet Noir

Associated names : 
(VB 91-26-04)
  • Rouge
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Cabernet B

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  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 2 Ha (0.02%)

Saint Laurent

Originating from Austria, Saint Laurent or Sankt Laurent was named in reference to the saint's day of 10 August, when the grapes would normally be ripe. DNA tests have recently shown that it is the natural progeny of Pinot Noir and Savagnin. This mid-season variety offers good resistance to winter frost, but it is prone to millerandage and coulure. It is not widely grown in Switzerland. Its wines are aromatic and colourful, with silky tannins and aromas of bitter cherry.
Associated names : 
Sankt Laurent
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 2 Ha (0.02%)

Nebbiolo

Originally from Piedmont (I) where it is used to produce the great wines of Barolo and Barbaresco, Nebbiolo is one of the oldest varieties in Europe, first recorded in 1266. Its name comes from nebbia (meaning mist), in reference to the down that covers its grapes. DNA tests have shown it to be the parent of several varieties in the north of Italy, such as Freisa and Nebbiolo Rosé. In Switzerland, this late-ripening variety has been grown since the 1970s, but its presence is minimal and its wines are highly tannic and full-bodied.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 2 Ha (0.02%)

Petit Verdot

A variety little known in Gironde (F), Petit Verdot was first recorded in 1736 in Bordeaux, where it has always played a minor role in blends, to add body and aroma. This late-ripening and productive variety, prone to dryness, is not widely grown in Switzerland, where it is generally used to make Bordeaux-style blends stronger and more colourful, with increased tannins.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 2 Ha (0.02%)

Bianca

A hybrid of Eger 2 and Bouvier created in 1963 at the Kölyuktetö research centre in the Eger region (Hungary). An early grape, productive and resistant to frost and disease, it is quite widespread in Hungary, with only a modest presence in Switzerland. Its wine has a neutral taste, with moderate alcohol levels.