Cépages

  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 6 Ha (0.04%)

Altesse

(A traduire) L'altesse serait originaire du sud-est de la France et aurait pour prestigieuse famille la syrah, la mondeuse, le viognier, la marsanne ou la roussanne.

  • Rouge
  • Traditionnel (av. 1900)
  • 5 Ha (0.03%)

Mondeuse Noire

An old variety from Savoie (F), Mondeuse Noire takes its name from Maldoux, in reference to its high natural acidity. DNA tests have revealed a parent-offspring link to Mondeuse Blanche, which means Mondeuse is related to Syrah, and explains why it is often called Grosse Syrah. In Switzerland, Mondeuse Noire was widespread before the 19th century in the Lemanic Arc and in Valais under the name of Gros Rouge. This vigorous variety is prone to disease, but has recently been the subject of renewed interest, producing spicy wines with a marked tannin flavour.
Associated names : 
Grosse Syrah
  • Rouge
  • 5 Ha (0.03%)

Cabernet Cortis

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  • Blanc
  • Indigène
  • 4 Ha (0.03%)

Sauvignon Soyhières

Associated names : 
(VB 32-7)
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 4 Ha (0.03%)

Auxerrois

A variety from Alsace-Lorraine (F), Auxerrois should not be confused with Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris or Chardonnay, which were also referred to as Auxerrois at one point, probably in reference to Auxois, the old name for Alsace. DNA tests have shown that it is the natural descendant of Pinot and Gouais Blanc, and thus a full-sibling of Chardonnay, Gamay, Aligoté and other minor varieties. In Switzerland, Auxerrois is now rarely grown, but it may be similar to the (H)Aussard or Ausserres variety which was very common in the 18th and 19th centuries in the cantons of Neuchâtel and Vaud. The wine has a relatively neutral flavour, with low acidity levels.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 4 Ha (0.03%)

Blaufränkisch

Blaufränkisch is one of many offsprings of Gouais Blanc, an old variety that was once grown throughout Europe. Now very widely cultivated in Austria, the historical distribution of Blaufränkisch includes Germany (under the name Limberger), Hungary (Kekfrankos) and Croatia (Borgonja), so its place of origin is likely to be at the crossroads of these regions. Sporadically present in Switzerland, this late-ripening variety prone to fungal disease produces structured wines with intense colours and sustained acidity.
Associated names : 
Limberger, Kékfrankos
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 4 Ha (0.03%)

Roussanne

Originating in the Rhone valley, Roussanne was mentioned in 1781 in a text on the wines of Hermitage. Its name refers to the red colour of the ripe grapes. DNA tests suggest that Roussanne is either a parent or an offspring of Marsanne. Ripening in mid-season, Roussanne is sensitive to wind, powdery mildew, grey mould and dust mites. In Switzerland, Roussanne is considerably less widespread than Marsanne, perhaps wrongly so when we consider the aromatic qualities and the high acidity levels of this variety, conferring a good longevity on the wines.
  • Rouge
  • 4 Ha (0.03%)

Cabernet Blanc

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Associated names : 
(VB 91-26-01)
  • Rouge
  • Indigène
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Muscat Bleu

A hybrid of Garnier 15-6 and Perle Noire, Muscat Bleu was created around 1930 at Peissy in the canton of Geneva (Switzerland). This early variety is appreciated by organic wine producers due to its high resistance to disease and its musky aroma. An amateur variety, grown for the table or the cellar and producing delicate, fruity wines, it is not common in Swiss winemaking.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 3 Ha (0.02%)

Cabernet Mitos