Cépages

  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 9 Ha (0.06%)

Souvignier Gris

Associated names : 
(FR 392-83)
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 9 Ha (0.06%)

Seyval blanc

A hybrid of Seibel 5656 and Rayon d'Or created in Isère (F), Seyval Blanc was named after a contraction of the name of its creators, Seyve and Vallier. In Switzerland, this vigorous and resistant variety produces fairly neutral-tasting wines with high acidity levels.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 9 Ha (0.06%)

Chenin Blanc

A variety from the Loire (F) where it is mentioned in the surroundings of Anjou by Rabelais in "Gargantua" in the 16th century, Chenin Blanc takes its name from the Montchenin monastery in Touraine. DNA tests have shown that Chenin Blanc is the natural offspring of Savagnin, and a full-sibling of both Trousseau and Sauvignon Blanc. Prone to grey mould, Chenin Blanc can produce a wide range of wines, from sparkling to dry, mellow or sweet. In Switzerland, its few territories are mainly around Geneva, with a few in Valais and the canton of Vaud.
  • Gris
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 9 Ha (0.06%)

Sauvignon Gris

A colour mutation of Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon Gris has long been known in the Loire region by the name of Fié. Headier and richer than Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon Gris is not widely grown in Switzerland.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 8 Ha (0.05%)

Leon Millot

An artificial hybrid of Millardet and Grasset 101-14 OP and Goldriesling created in 1911 at Colmar (Alsace, F), Léon Millot was named after the President of the Vosges Society of Viticulture. It is a full-sibling of the Lucie Kuhlmann and Maréchal Foch varieties. A very early and resistant variety, it is grown in Switzerland in cooler climates, mainly in German-speaking Switzerland, where it produces intensely coloured wines.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 7 Ha (0.05%)

Muscat Oliver

An artificial cross of Pozsonyi Fehér and Csaba Gyöngye, Muscat Oliver was created in 1930 in Hungary and first sold in 1975. Its official name is Irsai Olivér. In Switzerland, this early variety, sensitive to frost and powdery mildew, is named Muscat Oliver, and it produces light, fruity wines, for drinking when young.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 7 Ha (0.05%)

Scheurebe

An artificial cross of Riesling with an unknown variety (which is not Sylvaner as is often supposed) created in 1916 at the Alzey Research Centre in Rheinhessen (D), Scheurebe was named after its creator Georg Scheu. This late-ripening variety, which is prone to powdery mildew, is grown in Geneva and German-speaking Switzerland, where it gives dry or sweet wines with naturally high acidity and the aroma of blackberries and blackcurrants.
  • Blanc
  • Indigène
  • 7 Ha (0.05%)

Completer

An old variety from Graubünden (Switzerland) where there are records of it dating back to 1321 at Malans near Coire, Completer takes its name from completorium, the evening service of the Benedictine monks who were then authorised to drink a glass of it in silence. In Haut Valais, Completer gave rise to Lafnetscha, with which it is often confused. A late-ripening variety that enjoys the Alpine Foehn wind, Completer produces rich, strong wines, whose considerable natural acidity gives it great potential for ageing. By the 1960s it had almost disappeared, and today a few rare Completer vineyards persist in Switzerland, mainly in Graubünden, but also in Zurich, and since very recently in Valais.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 6 Ha (0.04%)

Freisamer

An artificial cross of Sylvaner and Pinot Gris, Freisamer was created in 1916 at Freiburg (D), giving it the nickname of Freiburger used in Switzerland and elsewhere, while Freisamer is a contraction of Freiburg and Dreisam, the river that runs through the town. A relatively late-ripening variety that produces distinctly acidic wines, it is sporadically grown in Switzerland, including in the canton of Fribourg, which is certainly no accident.
Associated names : 
Freiburger
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 6 Ha (0.04%)

Muscat Ottonel

An artificial cross obtained accidentally in 1839 at Angers (F), this variety was named after a certain H. Ottonel. Its heritage remained uncertain until DNA tests revealed it was a cross between Chasselas and Muscat d'Eisenstadt. This early variety is sensitive to fungal disease and has high levels of sugar. It can be used to produce dry or sweet wines. It is not widely grown in Switzerland.