Cépages

  • Blanc
  • Indigène
  • 29 Ha (0.2%)

Humagne Blanc

Humagne Blanche was recorded in Valais (Switzerland) in a parchment dated to 1313 alongside Rèze, making it one of the oldest varieties in Europe. DNA tests have shown that Lafnetscha and Himbertscha are offsprings from it, and that its ancestral origins may lie in the Atlantic Pyrénées (F). Its name could derive from the Greek hylomaneus, meaning blooming. Genetically, it has no connection with Humagne Rouge. A late-ripening and vigorous variety, Humagne Blanche was one of the most widespread varieties in Valais until the 19th century. Its wines are delicate and elegant, with notes of hazelnuts, and hints of resin as it ages.
  • Rouge
  • 29 Ha (0.2%)

Cabernet Dorsa

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  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 29 Ha (0.2%)

Johanniter

Hybrid resulting from artificial self-fertilization between Riesling and Freiburg 589-54 (with itself), Johanniter was created in 1968 at the Freiberg Research Centre in Baden-Württemberg (D). It is named after the former director Johannes Zimmermann. Highly productive and multi-resistant, in Switzerland it produces fresh, citrusy wines, with a bitterness often hidden by a bit of residual sugar.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 26 Ha (0.18%)

Dunkelfelder

An artificial cross of undisclosed parents, Dunkelfelder was created by Gustav Adolf Fröhlich (1847–1912), a private breeder at Edenkoben in the Palatinate region (D). DNA tests have rejected the Blauer Portugieser × Teinturier cross hypothesis. It was named in the 1970s in reference to its unknown origin and its colour (Felder meaning field and dunkel meaning dark). An early grape with red juice, it is prone to powdery mildew. It is grown in Switzerland mainly to improve the colour of blends.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 26 Ha (0.18%)

Solaris

A hybrid of Merzling and Geisenheim 6493 created in 1975 at Freiburg in Baden-Württemberg (D) and authorised in 2004, Solaris was named in reference to the sun, symbolising its vigour and precocity. In Switzerland, this variety, resistant to fungal disease, is cultivated particularly by wine growers concerned about the environment, because it doesn't need a lot of processing.
Associated names : 
(FR 240-75)
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 26 Ha (0.18%)

Müller-Thurgau

For a long time wrongly considered to be an artificial cross between Riesling and Sylvaner created by the Swiss H. Müller in 1882 in Germany, DNA tests showed this heritage to be incorrect, and in 2000 revealed it was actually a cross of Riesling and Madeleine Royale. Despite everything, the name of Riesling x Sylvaner (or Riesling-Sylvaner) has been incorrectly retained in Switzerland, where this very early variety with abundant yields prone to fungal disease produces light, aromatic wines lacking in complexity.
Associated names : 
Riesling × Sylvaner
  • Blanc
  • Traditionnel (av. 1900)
  • 26 Ha (0.18%)

Räuschling

An old German variety from the Landau region (Rhineland-Palatinate) where it was first recorded in 1546, Räuschling was once widespread in Württemberg, Alsace and the north of Switzerland. Its name may derive from the verb rauschen, in reference to the sound of the wind passing through its dense foliage. Paternity testing has determined that Räuschling is a natural cross between Gouais and Savagnin, both of which were very common in Europe in the Middle Ages. Today Räuschling has almost disappeared from its region of origin and is practically only found in German-speaking Switzerland (Zürich, Saint-Gall and Schwyz). Its wine is light, with good acidity, no doubt inherited from its ancestors, offering delicate citrus notes.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 25 Ha (0.17%)

Kerner

An artificial cross of Schiava Grossa and Riesling created in 1929 at the Weinsberg Research Centre in Baden-Württemberg (D), Kerner was named after Dr Justinus Kerner, who wrote drinking songs. Productive and prone to powdery mildew, it has good resistance to cold. In Switzerland, these wines are like a less acidic version of Riesling.
  • Rouge
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 25 Ha (0.17%)

Ancellotta

A variety originating in Emilia-Romagna in the north of Italy, Ancellotta was named after the Lancellotti family of Modena, which most likely propagated it from the 13th or 14th centuries. In Switzerland, this late-ripening variety with a rich colour and relatively neutral taste is mainly grown in the Valais region, and generally used to improve the colour of local Pinot-based wines. It is one of the ancestors of Galotta.
  • Blanc
  • Allogène (après 1900)
  • 24 Ha (0.17%)

Aligoté

Aligoté is a natural cross between Pinot and Gouais Blanc, which appeared in the late 18th century in the Saone valley in Burgundy (F). It is therefore a full-sibling of Gamay, Chardonnay, Melon and other lesser known varieties. Its name could derive from Gôt, an old synonym of Gouais Blanc, its genitor which was once widespread and is now almost extinct. An early grape that is prone to fungal disease, with varying yields depending on the terroir, Aligoté is grown mainly on the Côte d'Or and at Chablis in Burgundy, where it is also used for making kir. In Switzerland, it is mainly grown in Geneva, where it produces wines with a refreshing natural acidity.